Thursday, October 8, 2009

2005 Ducati Superbike 749 Dark

The Ducati 749 Testastretta and 999 Testastretta are the most advanced, highest performance, twin-cylinder motorcycles ever produced at our Bologna, Italy factory. They epitomize the racing history of Ducati and represent the evolution of a formula that has dominated Superbike racing for over a decade. This year’s Superbike family includes seven models: the 749 Dark, 749, 749S, 749R, 999, 999S and 999R.

Two years after the launch of the latest Superbike models, Ducati decided the time had come to incorporate in our production models the features of our race machines that make them unbeatable on tracks around the world.

In motion even when others are at rest. Quicker and sexier than ever, these are real race machines that epitomize the best of Ducati’s high performance tradition.

A perfect entry model to the Ducati Superbike family, the 749 Dark stands out with its totally black colouring giving it a compact and aggressive look. Ducati’s race-inspired, tubular trellis frame is matched with a front Showa fork and fully-adjustable rear shock absorber that result in confidence-inspiring and precise road holding.

With its short-stroke design and further innovations that extend to the very heart of the motor, the 749 is never short on power, producing 108 hp at 10,000 rpm and 8.2 kgm at 8,500 rpm.

By applying the knowledge gained on the racetrack, Ducati engineers have created our highest performance middleweight Superbike ever, with fully adjustable suspension, box-section aluminum alloy swingarm, and steering damper. The 749 is as at home on the road as it is on the track and is designed to offer an exciting, safe ride whatever the road conditions. A sleek riding position blends man and machine perfectly.

At 108 hp, the Testastretta provides lightning acceleration out of corners and incredibly smooth power delivery without putting stress on the chassis set-up. Excellent torque (8.2 kgm at 8500 rpm), even at very low rpms, guarantees superb performance while making the motorcycle easy to handle in heavy traffic.

Honorable Mention – Vespa GTS 300

Also from the Piaggio Group is the recent Vespa GTS 300. It includes the curvaceous Italian styling that has made Vespa a legend in the scooter world, plus it's the biggest, fastest, Vespa ever made. New riders would be well advised to go easy on the light-action throttle for the first few rides, as the GTS can whisk you away with a surprising pace in near silence and considerable grace. In Fonzie's upcoming review, he calls it “the invisible hooligan.”

If standing out in a crowd is you’re cup o’ tea, you’re sure to be seen riding aboard the Can-Am Spyder Roadster! Although it can't lean like a motorcycle (or a Piaggio MP3), it’s got some open wheels and puts you in the wind all the same. Basically, it’s a “flipped around” three-wheeler, putting the two-wheeled part of the trike in the front. Packed full of technology as well as eye-catching appeal, the Spyder now comes in three colors and two transmission choices: standard foot-controlled shifting (SM5) or a version that is capable of being shifted by hand (SE5, a sequential electronic 5-speed). BRP has built in a lot of fun as well as safety. The coolest part of this machine is the licensing. When last we checked, if you live in California or Delaware, you don’t even need a motorcycle license to operate one on the open road. Aging and/or handicapped riders who still feel the need for speed and excitement they once received by ripping down the road on two wheels can again feel that old thrill on the Spyder, and it's also proving to be attractive to new and female riders.


The BMW K1200GT is a sport-touring motorcycle made by BMW. The second generation K1200GT, introduced in 2006, uses essentially the same inline-4 engine as the BMW K1200S sportbike, which held the world speed record in 2005 for its class at 173.57 mph (279.33 km/h),[1] and the K1200R. The new model is lighter and more powerful than the first generation K1200GT, which was introduced in 2003.[2]

Standard features include adjustable seat, handlebars, integral ABS, panniers and electronically adjustable screen. Available options include: electronic suspension adjustment (ESA), xenon light, on board computer including oil level warning, automatic stability control (ASC), heated seat, heated hand grips, tire pressure monitoring (TPM), cruise control and anti-theft alarm

In late 2008, the K1200GT was replaced by the larger displacement K1300GT, which featured a 136 cc larger engine producing 175 bhp (130 kW) and 103 lb·ft (140 N·m) of torque.[3] The new bike also features improved optional ESA-II electronic suspension adjustment, a conventional single indicator switch and concealed crash bars.

Suzuki Hayabusa

The Suzuki Hayabusa (also known as the GSX1300R in some countries) is a hyper sport motorcycle originally introduced by Suzuki in 1999. It has a 1,298 cc (79.2 cu in) inline-4 engine and was consistently tested as the fastest production motorcycle in the world before the 2001 detuning agreement[clarification needed] referred below.[verification needed][1] The 2009 model has a MSRP of US$13,199.

Competition in the hyper sport bike segment increased with the release of motorcycles like the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 and BMW K1200S. This increased competition led to Suzuki heavily revising the GSX1300R for the 2008 model year.[3] Suzuki has dropped the GSX1300R designation in some countries and simply called the motorcycle the Hayabusa. The engine size was increased to 1,349 cc (82.3 cu in) with the compression ratio increasing to 12.5:1. The revised engine has a claimed 12% increase in power to 194 hp (145 kW).[4][5]

Fuel is now fed through a pair of new 44 mm (1.7 in) Suzuki Dual Throttle Valve (SDTV) throttle bodies. The Suzuki Drive Mode Selector (S-DMS), a technology introduced on the GSX-R line of motorcycles, provides three options of power delivery for a range of touring to wide open high performance. Some of the more notable features include a new 4-2-1-2 exhaust system meets Euro 3 and EPA Tier 2 emission regulations, a slipper clutch, and redesigned bodywork.

The motorcycle in stock form is capable of the following performance:

Ducati 1098

The Ducati 1098 was a super bike manufactured by the Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati for 2 years in 2007 and 2008. It was offered as the 1098, 1098S, and 1098R.[1] A successor model, the Ducati 1198, was introduced in 2009.

The 1098 shares more design elements with the older 998 than with its predecessor the 999, such as horizontally placed headlights and a non-integrated exhaust system. Another carryover from its 998 heritage is the single-sided swingarm which is decidedly Ducati. This return to more traditional Ducati design has been welcomed by many Ducati fans who criticized the design of the 999. The Ducati 1098/1098 S/1098 R were available in black, red or yellow. The 1098 was designed by young Ducati designer, Giandrea Fabbro.[2]

The 1098/1098 S makes a manufacturer claimed 160 hp (119 kW), 90.4 lb·ft (122.6 N·m) torque, and weighs 173 kg (380 lb). The 0-60 mph time is less than 2.5 seconds and top speed is estimated at 186 mph (299 km/h).[1] The 1098 R makes a manufacturer claimed 180 hp (134 kW), 98.8 lb·ft (134 N·m) torque. All these figures give the 1098 the highest torque-to-weight ratio of any production sport bike ever made

With the release of the 1098, Ducati created a stir not only with road riders, but also in the racing world, specifically the Superbike World Championship. In an attempt to level the playing field, WSBK regulations provide for concessions to motorcycles depending on the number of cylinders in their engine design. The fewer the cylinders, the more concessions, and with its two cylinder V-twin design Ducati was able to capitalize on many of these concessions.

Ducati argued that the current engine was at the end of its design life (which surrendered as much as 20hp to the competition in 2007, its last year in WSBK) and that it would be too expensive to keep the 999 competitive. The 2007 WSBK rules limited V-twin engines to 1000 cc, so Ducati effectively did not have a guarantee that the 1098 was eligible for entry in the premier class. Before releasing the 1098, Ducati lobbied the FIM to update the WSBK rules to accommodate its new bike, threatening to withdraw from WSBK competition if the rules weren't changed. Other manufacturers were not happy about racing a bike with a larger engine, especially when that bike belonged to Ducati, which has historically dominated WSBK competition, and Suzuki even threatened to withdraw if the rules were changed. Ducati prevailed when, in June 2007, the FIM announced that the engine capacity limit would increase to 1200 cc for 2008.[4]. However, this increase in displacement was not afforded without concessions on the part of Ducati. With the new 1200 cc maximum displacement for two-cylinders granted, the extra engine modifications allowed two-cylinder machines were surrendered. Engine modification rules for two-cylinder and four-cylinder machines are now parallel. Rules for three-cylinder machines remain as before.

Ducati won the 2008 Superbike World Championship on a 1098 R, along with the 2008 British Superbike Championship. Ducati have won 13 World Championships since the Superbike World Championship was established in 1988, and secured the manufacturer’s title for the 15th time.[5]

Honda CBR600RR

The Honda CBR600RR is a 599 cc (36.6 cu in) Honda super sport motorcycle that was introduced in 2003 as a race replica version of Honda's CBRFx series motorcycles. It has won every world supersport title since its introduction in 2003.

The CBR600RR was developed from and inspired by the Honda RC211V MotoGP bike. The similar physical appearance of the CBR600RR and RC211V is intentional. Underneath the looks lie MotoGP technologies that were made available for the first time on a production motorcycle such as the Unit Pro-Link rear suspension and Dual Stage Fuel Injection (PGM-DSFI).

Both were taken directly from Honda's MotoGP bike. While it's not uncommon for street bikes to utilize racing technology, this was the first time totally new technologies found their way to the production line the same year they made their way to the professional racing grid.

The bike receives the "RR" designation for "race replica" because of its emphasis on racing characteristics such as an advanced braced swingarm, center-up exhaust system, and more aggressive riding position. The 2003 model carried over to 2004 technically unchanged, but with new color schemes.

Suzuki GS500

The Suzuki GS500 is a popular entry level motorcycle manufactured by the Suzuki Motor Corporation. Suzuki produces two forms of the bike; the GS500 or GS500E from 1989 onwards and the fairing model GS500F from 2004 onwards.

The unfaired version of the GS500 was released in the US in 1989 as the GS500E. It was equipped with an air-cooled 487 cc (29.7 cu in) parallel twin engine derived from the earlier GS450.

The bike is widely used for commuting due to its good horsepower, decent torque, light weight, highly reliable engine and excellent fuel economy. They are also a popular choice for beginner riders because of their low price and cost of ownership.

The GS500 can be restricted under the maximum power to weight ratio for use in countries where restrictive motorcycle licenses are issued (such as the UK Class 'A' motorcycle license), adding to its worldwide popularity. In 2002, Suzuki stopped producing the GS500E for the US market and did not release a GS500 for 2003. In 2007, Suzuki dropped the GS500E from its UK range, but it continues to be sold in many other countries.

In 2008 the GS500 and GS500F models appear in the official UK Suzuki Dealers "on road" motorbike list (

Suzuki is known to drop the bike every few years to release an updated model.